It’s back to school time

Services

Sundays - 8:00 AM Liturgical & 10:30 AM Contemporary

by: Carolyn D. Pauling PhD RN

09/19/2022

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“…let us not [only] love in word or talk but in deed and in truth.” 1 John 3:18   

It’s back to school time (part 2) 

    Most of our children have started school already.  Here are a few additional tips to keep them healthy during the school year. 

    MANAGE ALLERGIES    Managing your kid’s allergies at school is an important part of caring for their health. Seasonal allergies are believed to affect as many as 40% of U.S. children, causing many to miss school. Even if they don’t miss school, allergies can get in the way of a productive school day. Symptoms like fatigue, headache, sneezing, runny nose, watery eyes, and itchiness can get in the way of attention and concentration. Food allergies are very common, too. If your child has allergies, talk with your child’s teacher and school nurse about how to manage them during school.

    STAY ACTIVE    Your kids have probably been active all summer, and it’s important to keep moving. Kids typically sit most of their school day, so incorporating sports and exercise into their daily routine will keep them focused, improve behavior, and boost positive attitude. If possible, enroll your kids in after-school activities. Enjoy a family walk or bike right and encourage them to keep moving. If you engage in physical activity, they will follow along.

    PROVIDE HEALTHY MEALS    Provide healthy meal options for your kids, including breakfast. Students who eat breakfast are more alert during class than those who don’t. Plus, the right foods combined with adequate rest will help fight off infections. Health snacks are a must as well. 

   STAY HYDRATED    Keeping your kids hydrated with healthy drink choices like water and milk has many benefits. It will help prevent fatigue, improve mood, aid digestion and maintenance, and enhance brain function. Try to eliminate sugary drinks such as soda, sports drinks and energy drinks, as they are often packed with sugar, caffeine and other unwanted ingredients. Too much caffeine can increase heart rates, blood pressure, interrupt sleep and cause nervousness and irritability.

    CHECK FOR HEAD LICE    More than 12 million Americans get lice every year, and most are between ages 3 and 11. School-age kids are in close contact during the day and are more likely to share combs, brushes, and hats. Check your kids for head lice once a week if possible. They are most often found behind the ears and at the back of the neck, near the neckline.

We Pray: Gracious God, we come to you at the beginning of this academic year with our many feelings, expectations, fears and hopes. Help us to remember, however, we have the comforting assurance from you: "I will always be with you." Loving God, for all of us this is a time of transition. It is transition from the work and leisure of summer back to the classroom. It is transition from time spent with family and friends. Give us patience with ourselves as we transition as well as patience with one another. We ask that you be with parents, students, teachers, and administrators.  Guide our teaching and learning. In Jesus’ name. Amen. 

Parish Nurse, 

    Carolyn D. Pauling PhD RN

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“…let us not [only] love in word or talk but in deed and in truth.” 1 John 3:18   

It’s back to school time (part 2) 

    Most of our children have started school already.  Here are a few additional tips to keep them healthy during the school year. 

    MANAGE ALLERGIES    Managing your kid’s allergies at school is an important part of caring for their health. Seasonal allergies are believed to affect as many as 40% of U.S. children, causing many to miss school. Even if they don’t miss school, allergies can get in the way of a productive school day. Symptoms like fatigue, headache, sneezing, runny nose, watery eyes, and itchiness can get in the way of attention and concentration. Food allergies are very common, too. If your child has allergies, talk with your child’s teacher and school nurse about how to manage them during school.

    STAY ACTIVE    Your kids have probably been active all summer, and it’s important to keep moving. Kids typically sit most of their school day, so incorporating sports and exercise into their daily routine will keep them focused, improve behavior, and boost positive attitude. If possible, enroll your kids in after-school activities. Enjoy a family walk or bike right and encourage them to keep moving. If you engage in physical activity, they will follow along.

    PROVIDE HEALTHY MEALS    Provide healthy meal options for your kids, including breakfast. Students who eat breakfast are more alert during class than those who don’t. Plus, the right foods combined with adequate rest will help fight off infections. Health snacks are a must as well. 

   STAY HYDRATED    Keeping your kids hydrated with healthy drink choices like water and milk has many benefits. It will help prevent fatigue, improve mood, aid digestion and maintenance, and enhance brain function. Try to eliminate sugary drinks such as soda, sports drinks and energy drinks, as they are often packed with sugar, caffeine and other unwanted ingredients. Too much caffeine can increase heart rates, blood pressure, interrupt sleep and cause nervousness and irritability.

    CHECK FOR HEAD LICE    More than 12 million Americans get lice every year, and most are between ages 3 and 11. School-age kids are in close contact during the day and are more likely to share combs, brushes, and hats. Check your kids for head lice once a week if possible. They are most often found behind the ears and at the back of the neck, near the neckline.

We Pray: Gracious God, we come to you at the beginning of this academic year with our many feelings, expectations, fears and hopes. Help us to remember, however, we have the comforting assurance from you: "I will always be with you." Loving God, for all of us this is a time of transition. It is transition from the work and leisure of summer back to the classroom. It is transition from time spent with family and friends. Give us patience with ourselves as we transition as well as patience with one another. We ask that you be with parents, students, teachers, and administrators.  Guide our teaching and learning. In Jesus’ name. Amen. 

Parish Nurse, 

    Carolyn D. Pauling PhD RN

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